How to Reduce and Manage Workplace Stress

We’ve all had the feeling of being tired, stressed and burned out from work. The physical and emotional repercussions of work-related stress can be detrimental to productivity and overall well-being, and it doesn’t seem to be improving for most workers. In fact, 70% of calls made to phone counseling lines at Workplace Options, a provider of employee-assistance programs, were related to stress and anxiety. Even more troubling, the same provider found that there was an 18% increase in calls made from 2016. With this trend clearly not slowing down, here are some tangible tips that can help you regain control over workplace stress and anxiety while becoming more productive and efficient.

Create time for mindfulness and deep breathing

From Wall Street to Silicon Valley, employees and employers alike are becoming more aware of the benefits of applying mindfulness in the workplace. With studies showing that mindfulness is associated with reduced stress and positive brain changes, it’s no wonder that these exercises have become so popular in business settings. There are a number of apps to choose from that will guide you through meditative practices, and you can even integrate some of them into your office communication platforms so that the reminder is more top of mind. Here at Circa, we’ve integrated the Stop, Breathe, and Think app into our messaging platform, Slack.

Allow for focused work, free of distractions and multitasking

Multitasking has been shown to inhibit productivity and efficiency. For those who feel like they have a million things being thrown their way, it can be easy to fall into the deep pit of multitasking. Not only does this add to stress and anxiety, but it undermines the ability to get tasks completed as thoroughly and efficiently when compared to more focused, singular work methods. Some effective ways to combat the temptation to multitask include:

  • Removing yourself from an environment of distractions, if applicable. We have an open office floor plan, as many millennial-dominated offices do today, and having a separate and secluded room that we can retreat to in order focus on more demanding or challenging tasks has proven to be a great addition.
  • Using time management tools like the Pomodoro timer. While these are fairly simple, straightforward tools (essentially fancy timers), they can be incredibly helpful in allocating dedicated time to each task while also preventing you from spending an excessive amount of time on any single one. This can help with workflow and make a heavy workload feel much more manageable.
  • Using noise-canceling headphones when you require heavy focus. Research has even found that music can have a calming effect when in high-stress situations.
  • Turning off notifications for messages that impede your ability to concentrate and focus. For example, we use the communication tool Slack almost constantly throughout our workday. In order to lessen the temptation to check Slack, email, etc., I have found that it is helpful to turn off any notifications and/or alter the settings to “do not disturb” mode (which is available for most messaging apps).

Take a walk

Studies have found that taking a brief walk (15-30 minutes) can result in calming effects. To capitalize on the benefits even more, apply meditative practices during your walk. Need to chat or brainstorm with coworkers and want to kill two birds with one stone? Merge walks and meetings into one. This can even help to jumpstart creative thinking for a more productive (not to mention healthy) meeting.

Be strategic about your notification settings 

It’s important to set boundaries between home and the office in order to maintain a healthy work-life balance. If you constantly have notifications alerting you of new work messages or emails, you’re pretty much setting yourself up for failure (unless you have spectacular self-control). Most people feel tempted or obligated to respond to an email if they see it, so dedicate a period of time outside of work where you don’t receive messages or make a point to only respond to urgent inquiries if you’re in a situation where you still need to monitor them. With our communication tool, Slack, there are options to set notifications to “do not disturb” mode, which is a simple and effective solution to this problem.

Find a project management tool that works for you

There is nothing more overwhelming and stressful than having more tasks than you feel like you can keep track of or keep up with. This is why pinpointing a project management tool that helps you to stay organized can be a huge stress reliever. I personally use Trello to manage my tasks and have created a system where I can prioritize them accordingly, as well as add notes, due dates, etc. Some of my colleagues rely on other tools and apps like Evernote, Wrike and even Google Calendar. Whatever your system is, find something that makes you feel organized and brings you greater peace of mind.

 

Caroline-Black-and-White-tan-3-4Caroline brings a wealth of knowledge in communications, marketing, and account management to the Circa Interactive team, and she has worked with partners such as HP, Cisco, and Adobe. Graduating with honors in Business Administration and Marketing from the University of Oregon in 2011, Caroline now plays a key role in Circa Interactive’s digital PR strategy by building long term relationships with internationally recognized media outlets on behalf of our clients.