7 Tips To Revolutionize Your Cold Email Marketing Strategies

So, you’d like to boost your sales or generate new leads, but your opt-in email marketing strategies just aren’t cutting it. Somehow, you find yourself with a list of leads, or “prospects”, that you’d like to reach out to for the first time but aren’t sure how to build the right process to get them to take an action. The following cold email tips can help drive a response while keeping the reputation of your domain safe. 

What is a Cold Email?

Cold emailing, or “email outreach” is here and it can boost your lead generation. It is the process of reaching out to an individual or organization that you haven’t interacted with before and requesting that they take an action. As long as you play by the rules, this can open up the door to a large number of targeted prospects.

An important piece of cold emailing that is often overlooked is how difficult it can be and how many technical aspects must be considered before you get the results you’re hoping for. For anyone interested in cold email outreach, here are six tips to get you started.

Cold Email Authentication and Trust

First and foremost, become familiar with CAN-SPAM laws and best practices. In short, you must always allow your prospects to unsubscribe at any time and must honor their request. But, it’s good to know that an unsubscribe link counts as a link. As we’ll discuss later on, you’ll learn how your recipient’s email servers will look for the amount of links in your emails. So, an alternative is to leave a quick note at the bottom of your email, letting know people know they can unsubscribe. Remember, you need to include your name and an address too.

Second, you need to authenticate your domain, otherwise known as whitelabeling. Your recipient’s email server has filters, like a gatekeeper whose sole purpose is to keep the user safe. So, when a server gets an email from johnnymarketing@university.com, but sees that it was sent through a different server, it will get suspicious and might potentially block you or mark you as spam. You are a stranger, after all.

This is where you need to go to your email provider’s sender authentication settings and begin the process of authenticating your domain. Your email provider will have instructions, with specific codes that you will need to enter into your website manager and go to your DNS settings. Authenticating your DKIM and CNAME is one of the most important things you can do to ensure that your emails are actually going through. But just so you know, some individuals have very strict servers, and even then – you might not be able to get through.

Another helpful tip is to authenticate through one of the biggest platforms, Google Postmaster Tools. This is an extra set of steps to help Google trust your emails when you’re reaching out to their users. Once authenticated, you can also see their reporting on your spam rate, domain reputation, and more!

Cold Email List Sizes

Third, understand your needs and the differences between Shared IPs and Dedicated IPs. Shared IPs are what your email provider probably has you in, unless you’re sending over 100K emails a month. These are pools of users who circulate IPs as they send their emails. Sometimes, there might be a user in your pool who acts poorly, and damages the IP pool you’re in, affecting your deliverability. It’s very normal, and happens all the time. If you are sending in high volumes, then you might want to consider getting a dedicated IP; a private IP that only you operate out of. This route also means learning how to warm up your IP.

Building a Quality Cold Email List

Fourth, make sure you have solid lists of prospects you’re reaching out to. If your email marketing strategy is targeting unvalidated, unrelated prospects – you will not get the responses you’re looking for and maybe even fall into some account trouble. How to find relevant prospects can be an entire separate post on its own, so for now let’s assume that you already have a list of prospects that are relevant to whatever your outreach is proposing. But, the key point after you have that list is to validate. The more bounces you get back, the less credible you seem. Basically, picture the ISP as security guards who observe everything on the internet. When they see bounced emails, they connect the dots and assume that you’re sending out mass email to people you don’t know. Tools like NeverBounce and BriteVerify will help you weed out the emails that are going to bounce.

Cold Email Segmentation and Drip Campaigns

Fifth, it’s time to create a campaign. Whatever platform you use, if at all, it’s important to come up with a gameplan to your email marketing strategy. Create a timed schedule of emails; sending out X amount of emails every X minutes, to a limit of X emails per day. You can see how this is starting to sound more and more calculated. If you have a domain gmail set up, then you need to remember that if you send a bulk list of emails at once, or even near sending 2,000 emails a day – you’re going to get on their radar and might end up in Google Jail.

It’s important to make sure that your emails, even if segmented, have intervals between them. Personally, I don’t let my emails go out within 100 seconds of each other. This way, Gmail can see my time stamps and see that my emails are not going out within the same minute. No matter how close in time, the timestamps are different for each email.

It’s helpful to create a campaign that runs through about two to three weeks, with five to six follow up emails being sent until the prospect responds. Your time range might change, but the name of the game here is to intermittently follow up on your prospects to let them know you’re interested to get in touch with them, without harassing them. This might mean adjusting how far apart you sequence your follow up emails. But it’s really all about getting a response first.

Writing a Cold Email That Will Get a Response

An important note here, the ISPs keep an eye out on the volume of emails you send out, but also closely watch how many people respond. It’s a big litmus test of trust. The thinking goes, if person A knows person B, then logically, person B would respond. So, follow up emails are incredibly important. Although you must always give people the option to unsubscribe or be taken off of your mailing list – you should have a high priority on getting a response, even if that response is to no longer be contacted.

Sixth, it’s time to start writing out your email copy. This part can also be an entire separate post in of itself, so I’ll stick to the basics. Keep it short, keep it friendly. If you are going to include links, make sure your links are branded or white labeled.Try to limit your emails to no more than one link. You want to sound like a real person, having a friendly conversation. Do not sound formal, remember that you are in the most basic sense asking a stranger to do a favor.

Cold Email Testing and Tracking

Seven, remember that any kind of tracking is going to show up on your prospect’s radar. For any first touch email, I turn off all forms of tracking. Open/Click tracking often works because your email provider embeds a hidden html image in your email to track. But, images are huge red flags for servers.

Last, it’s important to monitor your emails and data. In addition to honoring your unsubscribe requests, this is a good step to see where your emails are ending up, using tools like GlockApps. Take time each week to send a few tests to analyze and monitor how your emails are performing, if you’re inboxing, and to see if you’ve ended up in any blacklists.

These 7 tips cover a not so brief guide to cold emailing! Remember that each strategy must be adjusted to your goals, what works for me might not work for you at all. But, the basics are always going to be the same: be trustworthy (authenticate everything), be to the point (quick, simple copy with to the point pitches), and be friendly (don’t harass, write conversationally, honor what they say).

Best of luck!

Charlie recently joined the Circa Interactive team and helms our email and outreach strategies. Charlie is a graduate of Biola University and spent prior years as a digital content strategist and copywriter. He is a passionate, strategy-minded marketer that develops our link-building efforts.

Tools and Tricks to Help with Your Link Building Campaign

SEO continues to be a driving force in the marketing world, and as it becomes more integrated in other marketing functions, new roles seem to be popping up everywhere–SEO Analyst, SEO Content Strategist, and SEO Outreach Coordinator are just a few of the new titles we’ve seen lately.

Let’s narrow in on the SEO Content Strategist and the SEO Outreach Coordinator positions. These positions aren’t too surprising to see considering the fact that content and backlinks continue to be on the list of top SEO ranking factors year after year after year.

To oversimplify things, using content to boost rankings is something we can control. It comes down to doing the keyword research, optimizing your content, and tweaking things to get to the position you want–easy peasy, right?

Obtaining links on the other hand, is not as easy to control. You can reach out to as many publishers as you want, but you can’t force them to link to your site–hence the need for someone who specializes in outreach. While one position may seem easier than the other, they’re actually both just as complex, and both necessary for each other’s success.

The Content Strategist must not only focus on creating content that can rank, but also creating content that is engaging and valuable enough to merit links–making it easier for the Outreach Coordinator to earn links. Now, the Outreach Coordinator has to get links back to the content created by the Content Strategist in order to give the site and blog content the boost it needs to rise in the rankings.

Now that we understand how these two positions work together to boost each other up, we’ll go into some specific tools and tricks to help with link building.

Create wow-worthy content

We simplified it in the beginning, but creating great content that is optimized for search engines, but also engaging for people is not an easy task. That being said, you can control the value of the content that you put out.

Use keyword research to figure out what people are searching for–what do they want to know? Take that research and create amazing content that will fill the questions and needs of potential customers.

Finally, make sure that your content is not only optimized for search engines, but also visually pleasing and engaging. Canva is a commonly used tool that marketers use to easily create visual engaging content that increases shares and engagements. Users love it because it’s easy to import your own images and use the templates to make great images for social media posts and ads. Outgrow is another tool that users love for creating quizzes, calculators, and polls that will increase engagement and gather leads.

Increase efficiency with outreach tools

Backlink outreach campaigns can be painful. You can send 1,000 emails and get no response. You could put hours into building relationships with publishers on Twitter, but have zero backlinks to show for it.

While there’s no way to promise backlinks, you can increase the number of pitches you put out with outreach tools. Increasing efficiency is a crucial element of a successful outreach campaign, and below are a couple of suggested tools to try out.

Infusionsoft is a popular tool for sales outreach, but can easily be used for link outreach too. Users love the ability to prioritize contacts based on responsiveness. Buzzsumo is another popular influencer outreach tool. Users like the ability to create lists of influencers in a specific category using the platform itself.

A/B test different outreach emails and content types

Different types of content may have different success rates for earning backlinks. A/B test the different types of content you’re producing to determine which types are best for using in outreach emails. You should also A/B test the language you use in outreach emails to increase your ROI.

Earning links will not be an easy task, but with the right SEO team members working together, you can be sure that your content development and link building efforts are supporting and raising each other up.

Kelsey Reaves is a content-focused Marketing Manager at TrustRadius, a trusted site for B2B software reviews. When she’s not sharing her knowledge on the latest trends in software and B2B news, she nurtures her passion for travel by exploring new cities and binge watching Anthony Bourdain

15 Higher Education Digital Marketing Strategies for 2018

Every day, universities and colleges are coming up with exciting, innovative courses for the millions of motivated students all over the world. The higher education space is being redefined by innovation in design, delivery and employability for many degree programs. Education experts have the resources they need to craft, test and rollout cutting edge online degree programs. That’s why higher education institutions are bringing on board creative communication and marketing professionals to keep their institutions and programs visible and desirable. Here at Circa, we utilize unique higher education marketing strategies that help raise awareness of courses and programs while bringing in high quality students that enable online degree programs to flourish. 

Innovative PPC Strategies

Andrew Glasser and Farzin Espahani

The possibilities for higher ed marketing are seemingly endless when it comes to PPC. It is by and large the most immediate method for generating high-quality leads while broadcasting your brand to qualified individuals, ultimately turning clicks into prospective students. In Search, PPC is a hotbed for student acquisition, with degree-seekers constantly turning to Google and Bing to help them decide their career/academic path. Within Social, PPC offers increasingly advanced tools which we can use to hone in on subgroups of your target audience, fostering lead growth in the student acquisition cycle while simultaneously nurturing your Brand’s reach.

When it comes to paid advertising on social platforms, we notice a clear trend for universities who are marketing online graduate degree programs: All the ads are the same. The ad copy makes it clear that the program is flexible and completely online, and the visuals often convey a happy working professional looking satisfied in their new role. In 2018, it is our focus, mission, and purpose to ensure that colleges and universities make a commitment to standing out from the crowd by showcasing their true story. Students understand that they have basic needs in their degree program, but in 2018, millennials need to have a connection to something bigger. It is important for universities to look at their missions, ideals, and unique value propositions outside of online, flexible, innovative curriculum to begin conveying the information that matters to a student’s personal journey.

Mobile Optimized Search Ads

Studies continue to show that mobile devices are the go-to option for searching the internet. In fact, mobile devices are used more often for searches than desktop computers.  The average person checks their phone 150 times a day, the average time spend on a smartphone is 177 minutes per day, and amazingly, the average mobile session is 70 seconds. This means consumers are using their phones all day, every day, but in short bursts of time. By bidding higher for mobile devices in Google Adwords and Bing ads while utilizing mobile optimized ad extensions we can increase the CTR significantly.

Managed Placements And Interests

Managed placements is a good strategy when there are specific websites that you think are related to specific program or university where can be visited by a potential student. For example for an online MBA program, we want to place our display ads on education related websites and focus on pages relevant to higher education and career advancement. This will help us to make sure our ads are shown to those more likely to click on the ad to learn more.  

Facebook Retargeting Campaigns

The beauty and effectiveness of retargeting allows you to reach out to users who have already showed interest to your brand or program and to get them to re-engage with your brand. This is a slow but steady and cost effective strategy that converts more students compared to traditional targeting, since users are more likely to engage with ads from brands that they know. The best way to achieve a winner retargeting strategy is to start with a brand awareness ad to simply introduce your brand. Then running a retargeting campaign that shows new ads to those who have already engaged with your previous ad.

Fundamental SEO Strategies

Tyler Cooper

Every month, hundreds of thousands of prospective students are logging onto their computers, opening up Google, and trying to figure out where they should earn their degree. If your website’s SEO strategy is not up to par, chances are you’re missing out on the vast majority of these leads. While you can use Google AdWords to show up for these results, you’re going to be paying a premium for each click. When you rank organically, there is no cost per click. When looking at this from an ROI perspective, the value of SEO is undeniable. Having a large search presence means more organic traffic, more leads, more applicants, and more students. If SEO is not a part of your digital marketing strategy in 2018, you are doing yourself a huge disservice.

Link building

Link building is undoubtedly the most important aspect of your SEO strategy. In order to compete in competitive markets such as higher education, your website will need a steady stream of high-quality and relevant backlinks. There are a number of link building strategies. You can read more about those here.

On-Page SEO

In order to get the most out of your link building campaigns, it’s extremely important that your on-page SEO is in place. Make sure you all of the content on your website is properly optimized for search. This includes keyword rich title tags, relevant meta descriptions, keyword density, optimized header tags, internal linking, and much more.

Technical SEO

While this may require assistance from a web developer, it’s important that your site is technically sound so that it can be properly crawled by Google. The easier it is for Google to crawl and understand your site, the more your website’s pages will be shown in Google’s search results. On the other hand, if your website is full of technical errors, your search rankings will almost certainly suffer. Some things to look for when performing a technical SEO audit are: 404 errors, missing/broken XML sitemaps, slow page load times, duplicate content, irrelevant/thin content, and more! Use a tool like Screaming Frog to identify some of these common issues.

Website Content Strategies

Frederic Lee

Creation of website content (articles, infographics, data visualization, and more) is an essential aspect of any search marketing strategy. The primary reason being that Google favors websites with fresh content. With this in mind, a strategy of continuous creation and publication of content is important for website visibility in Google’s search results. In addition to creating fresh content, here are three core strategies to get the most ROI in this content.

Traffic and Rankings Focused Content

Through careful keyword research with an emphasis on target long-tail variations of your core keywords, content can be created with the best opportunity to rank in the search results. Keyword clusters/pods can be established in order to streamline content creation and may cover many keyword opportunity areas surrounding a long-tail variation. Upon completion and distribution, this content may rank for competitive keywords and either bring in large quantities of industry traffic, or a lesser, more valuable flow of conversion-focused traffic.

Conversion Support Focused Content

Depending on your business goals, conversion support content have a goal of providing detailed information about your product/service and industry. This content is designed to speak directly to individuals in the sales funnel. Through paid and organic social distribution and careful placement on your website, these articles are designed to be a strong touchpoint in the sales process.

Social Signal Focused Content

A portion of the Google algorithm involves having positive social signals pointing towards your website and content. Articles and graphics can be created with this exact goal in mind. A detailed analysis of your target audience and how they interact on social network is a key first step. This content must give them a reason to share and engage. Upon publication, strategic social sharing and promotion can help kick start this content on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other relevant networks to your industry.

Creative Digital PR Strategies

George Bradley and Joseph Lapin

In the higher education industry, digital public relations is an important approach for any SEO strategy. Here at Circa, we believe that the faculty are one of a university’s greatest assets, yet in general, many higher ed marketing companies are not utilizing these key stakeholders. By leveraging traditional public relations strategies for the digital world, digital PR not only influences brand awareness and thought leadership for universities, but it also allows us to create high level media opportunities for our professors in publications such as the Washington Post, The Hill and HuffPost. Not only are the professors being placed here, but we are obtaining backlinks to our program pages. This directly influences organic traffic that leads to conversions and new students. In collaboration with on-page SEO elements, content marketing, and other link building strategies, digital PR helps bring prospective students to a university and serves as a significant contributor to a diverse link profile for an authoritative website.

Relationship Building

Professors and reporters/editors are the two key relationships that should be built as part of a higher education digital marketing strategy. By building trusting relationships with faculty, you are able to gain an understanding of their research and passions and also create opportunities that are specifically focused on their expertise. Relationships with reporters can also prove to be greatly beneficial. When you have a reporter who trusts you, they are far more likely to respond to your pitch and come to you for a quote from one of your faculty members.

Creative Pitch Writing

Pitching compelling story lines and sources are the crux of any PR strategy. In the higher education digital marketing space, we leverage the faculty expertise to write pitches that relate to current trending topics in the news. There are often four key components to a pitch, and these are the lead, call to action, unique value proposition, and conclusion. You can find more information on how to write these pitches here.

Stay on Top of the News

Having access to and critically understanding the latest news is imperative because you want to stay ahead of the curve. There are various ways to understand what is happening throughout the world, and you should consider each method to be as important as the next. Understanding stories in the newspaper and tying in our professors is the perfect way to begin the pitching process. All of this comes back to understanding your professors and the people working on relevant stories within the media.

Organic Social Media Marketing

Audrey Wills

In 2018, social media is an imperative part to any digital marketing strategy –– especially for higher education. To put the importance of social media marketing into context, take a look at the graph below. When the Pew Research Center began tracking social media usage in 2005, less than 8% of 18-49 year olds in America used at least one social platform. Today, over 75% of 18-49 year olds are active on at least one social media site, meaning social media is the optimal medium for reaching higher education’s target audience.

While the growth in social media usage is a good thing in the world of higher education digital marketing, this increased usage leads to users being inundated with ads and content marketing. So much so that at the beginning of 2018, Facebook changed its algorithm to prioritize content from user’s inner circles. Thus, making it even more difficult to get content in front of your target audience –– organically at least. So what tactics can you use to ensure you continue to reach your audience and boost enrollment? Let’s take a look.

Know Your Platform

As mentioned before, Facebook changed their algorithm in the beginning of 2018 to prioritize content from a user’s family and friends. This means that whenever you post content, whether it is on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, you need to post content that best suits that platform.

Facebook’s algorithm favors content that people want to engage with. Think: would I share this with my friends? Content that is made for Twitter should be concise, yet informational. Let your followers know what you’re sharing and why. Do some research and identify the most active hashtags for your industry and use them throughout your tweets to help increase your reach. When creating content for Instagram, think visuals first, and make sure you have an eye-catching graphic that will grab your follower’s attention and get them to stop scrolling.

Keep up-to-date on social media marketing by attending a conference: http://circaedu.com/hemj/13-higher-education-marketing-conferences-in-2018/  

Live Video

One tactic that all social media algorithm’s love is Live Video. Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter enable you to leverage live video to interact with prospective students. My favorite tactic for utilizing live video is hosting live Q&A info sessions to address general program FAQs and provide prospective students the opportunity to ask questions and receive answers in real-time. Hosting a series of Q&A info sessions that address different areas of your program. To give students a better feel for your program, have different team members host each session. Anyone from an alumni, a current student, a faculty member, or even dean are perfect candidates to provide their own perspective and create a connection with the prospective students.

Chatbots At Your Service

Social media has changed the way we all communicate, and chatbots are taking our new forms of communication one step further. Chatbots provide a modern way for students to get questions answered instantaneously. Implementing chatbots into your recruitment strategy can help your admissions team speed up the enrollment process by weeding out unqualified candidates, answering questions in seconds, not hours, and even following up with potential students to ensure they finish their applications before the enrollment deadline.

Circa Interactive is the premier digital marketing agency in higher education. Since opening in 2011, Circa Interactive has helped more than 60 degree programs increase lead flow, build brand awareness,and generate more students. To find out how our services could help your institution, please email clayton@circaedu.com. 

 

How to Use Digital PR to Influence Organic Rankings

Public relations has always played an integral role in helping businesses and nonprofits to achieve their goals. But in today’s search-engine-reliant world, digital PR know-how has the potential to explode organizations’ visibility before the eyes of prospective customers. Unfortunately, too few PR pros understand how backlinking and search-engine optimization (SEO) work, and their importance in achieving their clients’ aims. By way of providing an introduction to this complex and rapidly evolving aspect of PR, I’m going to offer some insight into how we’ve helped enhance the visibility (and improved the bottom lines) of our clients.

Why Should PR Experts also be SEO Experts?

At Circa, our clients are institutions of higher learning, and much of our work involves elevating our clients’ professors and teachers as thought leaders. We do this, in part, by using traditional PR skills and tools to reach out to publications to arrange interviews with these professors and publish their content. Not only does this achieve the goal of increasing brand awareness, but it also accomplishes an increasingly critical goal for any successful business in the digital age: improved search engine visibility and rankings.

Our clients share a straightforward goal: to enroll more students into their university programs. In order to achieve this goal, they need to increase their brand awareness, and increasing awareness requires accomplishing two very specific tasks: showcasing the university’s value and also boosting its digital presence. By following our specific link-building strategy, we not only establish more credibility among our target audience, but we also rank higher in relevant keyword searches conducted by prospective students. Our strategy is one that could apply to any business that relies on PR to increase its overall brand awareness.

How to Leverage Digital PR to Gain More Digital Visibility

In the digital world, links are critical. Links help to boost a webpage’s rankings and ensure that search engines like Google recognize the page as genuine and credible. In the past, it was possible to buy or acquire links of little relevance from low quality websites in order to achieve a high search-engine ranking. That’s no longer possible. These days, web pages need to feature a select amount of natural keywords and links from other viable and relevant sites from high quality sources. The focus is quality of links. Acquiring these types of links can be challenging, especially since it requires establishing relationships between various content sources. However, this is a task that PR professionals are naturally equipped to tackle.

Using traditional tactics, PR professionals can actually generate significant digital results for their clients. For instance, a PR pro can pitch a reputable publication or website—one that’s relevant to the client’s specific interests—with the hopes of landing interviews or media placements. Once the PR professional is able to successfully land an interview or place a client-written byline in a publication, then it’s up to the PR professional to also achieve the crucial end-goal of acquiring the link to the desired webpage within the media placement.

Obtaining a link back to a desired page can be challenging depending on the publication, but it is certainly possible in many instances. Oftentimes, the best way to gain a link is through commonsense approaches. For example, a PR professional can ask a publication to link back to a specific site as a means of attribution. Additionally, the link shouldn’t be overtly self-serving—it shouldn’t take a viewer to a landing page, for instance, that pushes them to purchase something. Instead, the link should feature valuable, useful and relevant content.

If the client is a college, for example, and a PR professional is able to arrange an interview with one of the college’s professors to appear in a publication, then the link placed on the interview page should take the viewer back to the program’s homepage, giving the viewer a chance to learn more about the institution and potentially sign up for more information. This type of link placement strategy is fairly effective: the client receives a form of attribution and a natural link, but the publication won’t feel that it’s promoting the institution in an obvious or attention-grabbing way. When it comes to placing links, it’s all about common sense: PR professionals should use their networking and communication skills to ensure that their clients are properly attributed within the specific content.

The Data

In our experience, using expert commentary and byline opportunities coupled with keyword-based search campaigns and SEO-optimized webpage content efforts has helped to generate impressive results for our clients. For instance, our expert commentary efforts in publications like the Huffington Post resulted in over 2,000 social shares and 10 backlinks for one client, and the University of Wisconsin saw program inquiries jump by 33 percent because of our use of SEO-optimized content efforts .

In short, PR professionals can use their tried-and-true PR tools to not only boost their clients’ brand, but also influence search engine rankings. As long as PR professionals are willing to remain flexible and adapt to the demands of the digital world, they will be able to leverage their valuable communication skills to generate their desired results.

joeJoseph Lapin M.F.A. is an author, creative director, and journalist, and his writing has been published in the Los Angeles Times, Narratively, Salon, Slate, and more. He is a former adjunct professor at Florida International University, and he has worked on PR campaigns for Ernst & Young, Brentwood Associates, and more.

How to Build Backlinks to Infographics

In the online SEO world, there are a plethora of ways to build links and drive visitors to your resources. As many professionals already know, the two main ways to drive traffic to a site is through paid and organic search. Paid search involves using a marketing budget to boost online campaigns such as Facebook advertising and Google AdWord, whereas organic traffic is traffic that comes to your website as a result of unpaid search and is often achievable when appearing on the first page of Googles search results. As most of us already know, the number of links pointed to a particular domain has a direct correlation with search engine ranking results. So overtime, as resources and infographics gain more links, they will slowly rise to the top of the search engine results page for target keywords and drive the organic traffic you’re looking for.

 

Why are Infographics Used?

Many higher education institutions create infographics around breaking news stories or trending studies. They are then able to take a complex subject and turn it into an easy to understand visualization. When infographics are used as a link building strategy, especially in higher education, they can be leveraged to build links since they are educational, informative resources from high authority universities. As I mentioned in my last Higher Education Marketing Journal post, the reason infographics are preferred over other resources is because humans respond better to visual content and statistic show they are more likely to be shared.

Fast Fact: 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and visuals are processed 60,000 times faster in the brain than text.

 

Where do I Find Link Building Opportunities?

Now that you understand the underlying reasons as to why infographic resources are used, one of the first questions that may come to mind is “Where do I find a prospective audience who will link to this resource?”

Before you can start finding potential candidates for your infographic resource, you need to breakdown the infographic into topic specific sections. This will enable you to get a full understanding of what the infographic will discuss, and you’ll be able to identify specific niches and buzzwords which can be used to segment prospective bloggers.

After you’ve completed an in-depth analysis of the visual resource, you can start applying the three following tactics to begin your link building process.

  1. Backlink Analyses on Similar Graphics
  2. Capitalize on News Trends
  3. Identify Niche Experts

1) Backlink Analysis on Similar Graphics

Before you can build links, your first step should always be to find relevant contacts in your niche. The best way to do this is by running a backlink analysis to help you discover the sites that are linking to a specific domain.

In order to run backlink analysis, the first step is to find a list of infographics with similar titles or topics to the infographic you’re trying to link build to. For instance, the following infographic describes the leadership hierarchy in hospitals and healthcare.


leadership in hospitals
Using this as an example, you should run a Google search using the keyword phrase “healthcare leadership infographic” and then start browsing the top search results and images for similar infographic that have similar topics.

healthcare leadership

When you have found an infographic that is similar to yours, the next step is to take the specific infographic URL and put it into a backlink analysis tool such as Moz or Ahrefs. Once you place the URL in the backlink analyzer tool, you will be able find the sites that have linked to other health infographics.

backlinks
You now have a collection of sites that link to infographics within your niche. Next, you need to select the contacts and sites you want to get a link from. If a site has an extremely high domain authority (over 85), the publication will probably not post your infographic because it will not match their editorial guidelines. However, if the resource explains a trending subject in their industry it could still be worth attempting to gain a link from some highly authoritative sites. After you narrow down the most relevant link building candidates, you need to add them to your outreach list and send an email asking if they would be interested in your resource.

 

2) Capitalize on News Trends

The second link building tactic relies on finding publications that are discussing breaking news or trending stories within your specific niche. Since the news is always timely and constantly changing, you’ll be able find a number of news pegs that relate to your infographic. The main objective of this strategy is to tie in your infographic as an additional resource to what is happening in the news. This is a way to give reporters and bloggers a way to back up their initial stories. As an example, let’s say that you have an infographic that discusses the impact of climate change. You simply search for climate change in Google News and filter through the search results to find publications that are speaking about the latest developments on this subject. Check out this screenshot to get a better understanding of what you will be looking at.

climate change search

As you can see, climate change is being discussed on a consistent basis. These are only the first three results and they could all be added to your outreach list. Now let’s take this a step further. In order to improve the chances of gaining a link, you would want to click-through each article and find the exact author who wrote on the subject. Once the author is identified, you’ll be able to angle a pitch that speaks directly to the writer’s interest, giving you higher chance of landing a link. Always remember that the news will change, but with enough creativity you can get your resources tie in with the trending stories.

 

3) Identify Niche Experts

With over 2 million blog post being written each day, there are limitless link building opportunities available. Think about that for a second. This means over 1,389 articles are being published each minute. Now all you have to do is find the right people to reach out to, and luckily enough, the Internet has made it possible to contact numerous experts in fields ranging from artificial intelligence, labor outlook, health trends, and everything in between. The best way to find these experts is by searching keywords through social media platforms such as Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. For this example, let’s use the climate change topic again. A great tool to use to assist you with finding these experts is the Twitter Advanced Search Feature. Once you reach advanced search page, always add your collection of keywords in the first line of the search bar and change the date parameters to only focus on the past year.

twitter advanced search
Once you run this search, you’ll be able to filter through the top post, accounts, photos, videos and more, but in order to narrow down to the field experts you’ll want to segment by accounts. Here are the results that were produced from the above search.

climate change twitter
Each of these accounts are either niche publications or experts focused on developments happening in climate change and global warming. Now that you have a collection of climate change individuals at the tip of your finger, the next step is to scrape the entire Twitter search results and add them to your outreach list.

After using these three link building strategies, you will have compiled a list of highly targeted individuals that have built links to infographics before. To finish this process, the final step is to divide up the publications and experts into niche subsegments so you are able to create a personalized outreach pitch that will intrigue each expert.

I hope you are able to build awareness around your infographic resources, gain an abundance of backlinks, rise up in Google rankings and drive organic traffic! Now it is up to you to create your outreaches and email your list of prospective link builders. Happy link building!

 

andersonidea

Austin Anderson is a forward-thinking, motivated marketing specialist. Before Circa, Austin ran an e-commerce business and managed online marketing for startups in San Diego. Austin strives to be a future influencer in the world of digital marketing. Connect with Austin on LinkedIn and Twitter @andersonidea.

A Step-by-Step Guide on how to Leverage University Events for Your SEO Strategy

Universities throughout the United States regularly host events and conferences with the intention of bringing awareness to certain topics and causes, while simultaneously building upon their thought leadership within the industry. However, while more organizations and institutions are beginning to leverage online tactics to promote their events, many are still missing out on a key opportunity to build links to their event, which will in turn help with rankings and visibility for the program. Here at Circa Interactive, we have found that using university events and conferences as an SEO and link building tactic can be a very effective strategy in boosting our clients’ rankings and brand awareness. The reason that this strategy is so successful is because featuring relevant industry events can provide great value to a publication’s readership. For example, we recently acquired twelve links over a ten day period for a brain summit hosted by one of our university clients, which clearly proves that this strategy can be a powerful and effective one. Here is a step-by-step guide on how you can achieve the same results for your university program events, including but not limited to: conferences, conventions, exhibits, and university tours.  

Start with Event Websites

You should begin by targeting national event listing sites as these will be relevant to every event that you host and serve to create easy link wins. Many of these sites simply require you to send them the details of the event, along with the URL, so that they can verify whether it is a legitimate event. This is a great tactic to obtain your first batch of links. These links are also likely to be diverse in comparison to many others you may have in your portfolio, thus further increasing the value of these placements. A diverse backlink portfolio with a variety of high quality wins is seen as a positive indicator to Google and will therefore be beneficial from an SEO standpoint. Some national event listing sites that I would recommend starting with are: lanyrd.com, conferencealerts.com, and eventbrite.com.

Write a Press Release

The concept behind a press release is to share newsworthy content with relevant contacts. This should be used to accompany your link building efforts. If possible, also factor in how this press release will work best from an SEO perspective and how a search engine will recognize your keywords. Your press release should elaborate on the details of the event, discuss the target audience, and note who the key speakers are. Also remember to include any contact information so that media outlets can obtain more information if needed. Alongside this, remind the media contact why this topic is important in a wider context. This can be achieved by using a news peg that is closely associated with your event. Prior to our client’s brain summit, a report stated that the rate of ADHD diagnosis had risen 5% each year since 2003. This data signified the importance of continued brain research and enabled us to provide media contacts with an additional reason to publish information on the event. A press release has the potential to spread far and wide because many media outlets pick up stories from other local media sources. If you can find a few sites that are willing to post your press release, then this could create a ripple effect and you might end up with a number of placements in a short amount of time without having to manually acquire all the placements yourself.  

Look for Local Links

A big part of your strategy should be to target sites that report on news in the area where your event is being held. Being featured on the main page of newspapers, tourism sites, and local news sites can be difficult, but securing a link placement in their events section is certainly possible and very valuable. This provides a great opportunity to land a diverse set of links that may have been otherwise been very difficult to attain. News outlets are also more likely to be interested in an event that is being hosted in an area that they regularly cover and that is of interest to their readership.

Target Industry-Specific Sites

In addition to targeting sites that report on local news and events, it is important to pitch your event to industry-specific sites. If your event is based around the topic of mental health, then it makes sense to target blogs and news sites that cover mental health related topics. However, you should not solely limit yourself to these confines and should not be afraid get creative and expand your outreach whenever possible. Reaching out to sites that cover other medical related topics would not be too far fetched in this case. If you can position the event to be relevant and valuable to the publication’s audience, then you will have a better chance of getting a media placement and link out of it.

Conduct a Competitor Analysis

You are unlikely to be the first organization that is hosting an event or conference related to your specific niche. Discovering where similar events have been posted is a surefire way to find websites that you know are willing to post this type of content. Again, if you are hosting a conference on mental health, searching for simple keywords like “mental health conferences” in Google will enable you to find a host of previous events on this topic. You can then conduct a competitor backlink analysis for each event to discover which sites linked to them. There are a number of tools out there that can be used to conduct this analysis, but here at Circa we use Moz. You simply need to enter the event’s URL into Moz’s Open Site Explorer search bar and from there you will be able to view all inbound links to that particular URL. Moz only allows you to have three free searches a day unless you upgrade to Moz Pro. However, you can test out this software with a 30 day free trial. Once you determine which sites are good quality, a competitor analysis will provide you with an important set of leads to go after. One easy way to help determine which sites are high quality is to reference the information provided alongside the list of inbound URL’s, which includes the domain authority (DA) and the spam score. The domain authority ranges from 1-100, and the higher it is, the better and more high quality the site is. Conversely, you want the spam score to be as low as possible. By finding and targeting sites that have posted similar event information in the past, you will likely save time and resources on outreach while also increasing your success rate.

Follow Up After the Event

Even if you have acquired a respectable number of links prior to the event, your outreach shouldn’t stop there. Some of the best opportunities will come after the event, which is particularly relevant following a conference. The findings from a conference are often a great source of content for media outlets. Conducting searches on Google and social media will help you find individuals who have been talking about topics that relate to your event. Creating a new page on your website which discusses and dissects the findings will also help you to gain links following the event.

George has recentGeorgely joined the Circa team in California following the completion of his master’s in marketing management and strategy degree, where he graduated with distinction from Plymouth University in England. George is a PR and digital marketing specialist who is passionate about creating high level opportunities for professors within national publications. 

The Value in Video

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Finding new ways to attract viewers has always been a challenge in the SEO world. When it comes down to it, ranking a website in the long term is not just about building a large number of links. It’s also about creating high-quality content that will attract links naturally over time. It’s the age-long battle of quality vs. quantity, and it has become fairly clear that the newest contender in SEO is online video.

Do your Marketing Basics

The first step in any effective communications-style campaign is understanding your audience. To ensure effective communication, think primarily about the people you want to view the video. Whether you’re targeting prospective students, student parents, undergrads, or professors, each video will serve a unique and distinctive purpose that should not be transparent throughout your other demographics. By putting yourself in their shoes, you will gain insight into what they want to know and how they want to be addressed. With this in mind, the distribution and formulation of your videos should correlate with each respective goal and message in mind. By appealing to these audiences, a video’s sense of quality will increase which will, in turn, lead to more visibility from an SEO standpoint as well.    Video-Marketing-Strategies

Time is Money

Lets talk about Google for a second. One way that Google recognizes sites that are high in quality is by measuring how long a viewer stays on the page. Obviously, if it is an interesting and high quality site, someone’s going to stay for a longer period of time. A high bounce rate could be an indicator of a lower quality page, while a ‘long click’ — more time spent on a page — identifies a better domain in the eyes of a search engine. Needless to say, video offers an unprecedented opportunity to capture and engage viewers in a way that other forms of media simply lack. Placing program overview videos, digital tours or faculty interviews is a great way of implementing this strategy and can be done at a very low cost.

This is a great example of an interactive campus tour video provided by St. Michaels College:

Allowing the viewer to engage with your site is proving to add more and more value as quality is becoming more targeted.

Video on the SERP

Aside from the added viewing time and quality given to your programs pages, video helps to differentiate your brand on the search engine results page (SERP) through a video thumbnail result. Zappos, for example, created 50,000 product description videos in 2009 and doubled their linking domains. It should be unproblematic to take lessons like this and apply them to a schools program/department. Here is a step-by-step walkthrough for getting these video results on the SERP:

  1. Add keywords in a video title such as “Tutorial”, “Review”, “Explanation”, “Tour”, etc. to help identify/organize content and provide a shortcut to what your potential viewers are looking for. Keep it simple and to the point.
  2. When hosting your videos, be sure to use sites such as Vimeo Pro, Wistia, Vzaar or Viddler. Do NOT use a regular vimeo account or youtube as their domains will rank for your video on their site rather than your own domain.
  3. Embed videos via an HTML5 player with flash fallback. All of the listed hosting recommendations above should include this option.
  4. This one’s important. Surround the video with information. Images, links and text help search engines recognize a quality page, so make sure your video at least comes with a text description. A page with only video content on it can look very thin. An easy way of doing this is to provide faculty bios/pictures or student testimonials.
  5. A video sitemap is the main way of giving search engines rich meta-data about your video. Wistia offers sitemap generation at the price of a $25/month subscription. Refer to this video for further sitemap guidance:

Make it Sharable

Let people spread your content. Placing linked social icons on your video page only facilitates the endeavor to get your video into the world. If you’re looking for the basics I’d recommend getting the code from TwitterFacebook and Google directly or throwing the “AddThis” widget on any page. Additionally, make your video embeddable, so others can throw it up and you can get further SEO value. For a quick guide on getting inbound link benefits from embedded videos, see here.

Social Networking Concept

When it comes to video, as with all other content, quality is key. With search engine algorithms getting tighter and tighter, it’s crucial to stand out not only for branding purposes, but to enhance your algorithmic SEO value as well. Along with these simple steps for recognition, having quality content should provide you with a multitude of benefits that can be translated into both the physical and digital worlds.

Why Guest Blogging is Not Dead in Higher Ed

The search marketing world has been on fire lately after Matt Cutts, Google’s head of spam, published this Tweet:

2014-01-24_12-00-38

It’s a bold statement, and I’m sure it stopped many of us in our tracks as we were sipping our morning coffee.  It definitely caught my attention.

To quickly summarize the blog post Matt’s Tweet referenced:

“if you’re using guest blogging as a way to gain links in 2014, you should probably stop.”

He goes on to explain, noting that like most other effective SEO tactics in the past (think blog comments or forum profiles), people are taking advantage of guest blogging and it’s now a breeding ground for spam.

You know what?  He’s right!

Like any effective SEO tactic, people started gaming the system.  It was only a matter of time before Google started cracking down.

But, answer this: how many of us didn’t already know this?  Between Matt Cutt’s previous blog post along with some notes from Rand Fishkin, it was very clear that this was coming.

So where does that leave us in the higher ed marketing world?  Should we ditch guest blogging altogether?

Well, yes and no.

In my eyes, Matt Cutt’s focus on the “death of guest blogging” is centered around those who are utilizing low quality, low relevance guest blog websites and networks in an effort to generate as many links as possible.

While I can understand why some marketers were seeking these sub-par opportunities, I don’t really think this recent rant on guest blogging from Matt Cutt’s applies too heavily to us in higher ed.  Why?  To be frank, we don’t have to seek out these low quality websites to publish our guest posts.

We are fortunate to work in an industry with reputable clients who are trusted and sought after for their thought leadership and ideas.  A lot of bloggers and publications will jump at the opportunity to feature content created by most colleges and universities.  That said, we must begin to shift our focus on landing big wins, seeking opportunities to secure placements in major publications and/or influential websites in our programmatic niches.

The reality is, we live in a very different SEO world than most other industries – even if you’re working with a small or lesser known university.  Yes, our industry is extremely competitive but due to the brand power that we represent and the simple fact that we have a .edu in your URL, we aren’t always forced to seek out the easy targets like other industries.

Guest blogging was one of the last forms of effective link building that was both scalable and cost effective.  Until recently, it was totally acceptable tactic that worked well.  It still does work, but only if you’re smart about it and seek opportunities that don’t fall into the quality standards we’ve become accustomed as of late.

The unfortunate reality in search marketing as a whole, however, is that it isn’t getting any easier or any less expensive.  If you have been using guest blogging as a way to generate link volume, you probably should start looking into alternate opportunities to generate links.  It would be wise to lower your dependency on guest blogging overall, and if you’re pursuing low quality placements I’d avoid those all-together.

We’re in the midst of a very interesting and challenging time in search marketing.  Visual content is becoming the cornerstone of most marketing campaigns and to be effective, more time and resources are required to create the results you need to be successful.  As education budgets continue to decrease, it’s really going to make search marketing interesting in the higher ed world.

So no, guest blogging is not dead.  When utilized correctly it remains an effective avenue to generate high-quality links, referral traffic, establish thought leadership, and expand brand recognition for your college or university.  We just have to approach the tactic in a different manner and pay close attention to where we’re publishing content.

Moving forward, guest blogging won’t be as quick and easy as it was in the past, but it’s still worth it if done correctly.  You might be surprised where you can get some traction.

Takeaways:
  1. Guest blogging isn’t totally dead in higher education marketing.
  2. Stop looking at guest blogging as a way to generate link quantity and start focusing on quality – it will pay off.
  3. Lower your dependency on guest blogging, and balance your strategy with infographics, surveys, video, interviews, and other high-quality content.  Find out what you target audience responds to and run with it.
  4. Get the help of a PR professional and a strong writer to craft highly targeted pitches for your guest posts.
  5. Seek out the “homerun” placements – you’ll be surprised what you can get.


Clayton Dean is the Co-Founder of Circa Interactive, a San Diego-based digital marketing agency that specializes in higher education.  Connect with Clayton on Twitter: @CircaClayton

Higher Education Marketer’s Guide to Infographics

Infographics.  We’ve all heard of them.  Some hate them, some love them.  No matter what side you’re on, you can’t deny that they still work – really well actually.

This especially holds true for colleges and universities, who have the reputation, research, and resources to produce highly sharable and very interesting infographics.  Additionally, webmasters and bloggers may not be interested in infographics from unknown brands but will jump at the opportunity to feature an infographic from a .edu.

My question is, why aren’t more marketing teams making use of them?

In today’s world of higher education, especially for online graduate programs, you must be doing something to set yourself apart.  The market is far too competitive and growing by the day, making the organic search landscape as volatile as ever.  Search engine rankings are still vital for programs to drive and generate high-quality traffic, and the days of relying on basic on-page SEO are gone.  As you’re probably figuring out, your link building strategy must be natural and very well-rounded, and that’s where infographics come in.

The problem is, as most of you know, there are a lot of bad infographics out there.  Marketers think they can quickly throw one together and magically start generating links and social shares.  In reality the topic, content, and design can make or break an infographic.  Additionally, you must have a clear distribution strategy that effectively targets the relevant websites you need but at the same time reaches as large of an audience as possible.

Below I’ll show you why you need to make infographics part of your organic marketing strategy and walk you through, start to finish, how to effectively create and distribute them with the goal of influencing your organic presence.

Why you should be using infographics

When it comes to SEO and rankings, back link diversity is huge in today’s world.  Social signals are also important and definitely play a factor in Google’s eyes.  Fact is, you can’t put all of your eggs in one basket when it comes to where your links are coming from and when utilized effectively, infographics are the perfect solution.  They provide the perfect mix of relevant natural looking links from niche specific sites and major publications, along with a slough of Tweets, Likes, Shares, Pins, and Comments.

Through the use of infographics, you’ll not only be positively influencing your organic presence, but also driving traffic and brand recognition at the same time.  Win – Win – Win.  What are you waiting for?

Infographic Creation, Start to Finish

Topic Research and Creation

The key to a quality, sharable infographic starts with the topic.  For me, this is the most important part of the process and will determine how effective your infographic will ultimately be.  When researching topics, you must always keep in mind the end goal – share ability.  What will your target audience be interested in learning more about?  You must also keep in mind a broader audience, because ideally you’d like the infographic to appeal to as many as people as possible.  Are there any newsworthy or larger conversations around the program you’re creating the infographic for?

Tools:

1) Alltop.com – Alltop is an aggregator of the top blogs/website that are regularly updated for just about every topic under the sun.  Scan through each category and the blog topics under each.  Which ones stand out?  Are there any topics that are talked about more than others? This is the first place I go to get a gauge on the industry and what’s being talked about.  Not to mention it’s also a great way to find and document potential blogs to target during the distribution process, so keep an eye out.

2) Google news – Throw your infographic topic ideas into Google and see what current news topics render.  This is great for identifying larger trends in the industry and spotting some ideas you many not have thought of.  I personally like to click-through and read some of the articles and usually uncover some new ideas for topics as a result.

3) Google search – search for major publications, journals, or other reputable sources.  This is a great way to get a pulse on the perspective industry and the major topics they’re talking about.

4) Google trends – Google trends is great for gaining an understanding of what people are searching for and is very helpful once you’ve narrowed your list of ideas down to a handful of potential subjects.  Throw them into trends to see if any are relevant now or increasing in relevance.  If you can produce an infographic that corresponds with what’s in the news or what’s popular, you’re life during the distribution phase will be much easier!

5) Schedule time to chat with a professor in the program – This is especially true if you’re at a research university.  These faculty can be a great resource for understanding the industry as a whole, what interests them, and any emerging topics that would be interesting.  Some may even be working on something that could contribute directly to your infographic, who knows.

Tips for Infographic Topic Creation:

1) If possible, try to take advantage of topics that are popular now (if you can turn the graphic around in a timely manner)
2) Ensure the topic is relevant to your target audience
3) Ensure the topic will appeal to as broad of an audience as possible
4) Always keep distribution in mind – ask yourself “will webmasters in the niche be interested in this topic?”

Infographic Research

The research phase of the infographic creation process isn’t rocket science.  The main takeaway here: ensure you’re utilizing highly reputable resources for your research.  If possible, try to centralize your research around .edu, .gov, or highly reputable .coms.  Ditch the wikis, blogs, and other questionable sources.  Better yet, if you can tap into any internal research from one or more of the program’s professors and utilize that data you could really hit a home run.  That way you know you’re working with trustworthy data and during the distribution process you utilize that fact as leverage for the bloggers and webmasters.

Tips for Infographic Research:

1) No wikis, blogs, or other opinion based sources
2) Look within for research conducted by program professors or faculty
3) Don’t self-promote!  No one wants to share that…
4) Ensure your research flows well and tells a clear story

Bonus Tip: When starting your research, first map out the entire graphic by title, then fill in the holes.  In looking at the infographic from a macro perspective, you can get a better gauge of the story you’re telling and ensure it effectively illustrates the topic.

Example:

Title: STEM Education’s Largest Hurdles
Section 1: STEM Overview
Section 2: STEM Progress
Section 3: What’s preventing the STEM Initiative’s Success?
Section 4: The Future of STEM

Infographic Distribution

You’ve created a relevant and interesting title, conducted all of your research, and now you’re ready to show it off to the World.  This is where a lot of marketers tend to get a little lost.  It can be overwhelming to figure out where to start, but the sooner you can nail down a process the better.  I always recommend solidifying your process, then always working to tweak and refine the process.  As with everything else, some channels come and go so you must always keep your eyes and ears open for new ways to get your infographic out to the masses.

To help get you started with your process, here’s a brief overview of mine:

1) Submit infographic to infographic promotion websites

Some of my favorites:

http://visual.ly/

http://infographicjournal.com/

http://www.newsilike.in/submit-infographic/

A great list of additional sites: http://www.paddymoogan.com/2012/01/14/list-of-infographic-sites-for-link-building/

2) Submit infographic to myblogguest.com

  • This will advertise your infographic to hundreds of bloggers, and you get to pick who publishes it (before accepting, take a look at the bloggers site first to get an idea of the strength, legitimacy, and trustworthiness of their website)

3) Seed infographic on social platforms

  • Reddit
  • Stumbleupon
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Google+
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Pinterest
  • Slideshare

4) Buy an ad on Stumbleupon or create a display campaign around the infographic

  • I wouldn’t do this for all infographics, just the ones that are highly relevant and interesting.  You can burn through your budget with this so please beware!

5) Have any connections or relationships in the news publication industry?

  • Pitch your infographic to writers at the major online publications
  • Writers tend to love great infographics – think about it, you’ve already done all of the research for them!

6) Research and create a list of highly relevant 40 to 50 blogs and websites that you can manually reach out to

  • When searching for these sources, I would recommend first starting out by searching for infographics around the topic or industry that websites have published in the past.  If they’ve published one before, there’s a good chance they’ll do it again.

Google search: “infographic topic” / “topic” blogs / allinsite:”topic” / allinblog:”topic” / allintitle:”topic”  – get creative!

Followerwonk: Great tool from Moz that can be utilized to find top influencers in a specific industry.  Seek them out and shoot them an email through their blog or website

A few tips:

  • Keep it personal – don’t mass email
  • Keep it brief – get to the point
  • Provide the embed code and attach the original infographic to the email
  • If you can’t reach them through email, try Twitter or Facebook but don’t overdo it!
  • Request the anchor text and URL you wish to use – I would recommend purely branded anchor text or a combo of branded and target keyword
  • Be sure to follow-up!

The Circa Interactive Top 5

Issue# 1

Circa Interactive’s bi-weekly list of the top five articles and blog posts from around the web geared specifically for higher eduction marketers.

1) Higher Education Searches Rise on Google, Reveal Marketing Opportunity [Study] 

Jessica Lee discusses Google’s recent release of their quarterly higher education search analysis and provides insight into demand trends, ppc, and local implications of the higher education search market.

[via searchenginewatch.com]

2) Some of the best higher education copywriting for admissions 

A closer look the messaging and writing styles of university admissions departments, East vs West style…

[via uofadmissionsmarketing.com]

3) The Top 10 Ways to Generate Traffic and Leads for an Online Degree Program 

Robert Lee provides an overview of the top 10 channels an online degree program can utilize, weighing ease of implementation, cost, and effectiveness.

[via higheredmarketingjournal.com]

4) A few excellent higher education information request forms 

Lead forms can make or break a program’s conversion rate, and takes a look at those who are doing it well.

[via uofadmissionsmarketing.com]

5) Campus – Do We Under Market Our Most Important Asset?

Kyle James examines how you can use your most obvious asset to gain a competitive advantage.

[via http://doteduguru.com]